What are the consequences of female circumcision for young girls and women?

Published on : 27 September 20224 min reading time

Female circumcision, also known as female genital mutilation, is a practice that involves the partial or complete removal of the external female genitalia. The consequences of female circumcision for young girls and women can be both physical and psychological.

Physical consequences of female circumcision can include severe pain, hemorrhage, infection, and even death. In addition, the practice can cause long-term problems with urination, menstruation, and sexual intercourse. Psychological consequences can include post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety, and depression.

Female circumcision is a practice that is rooted in cultural and religious beliefs, and is often seen as a way to control women’s sexuality. However, the consequences of the practice are clear, and they can be devastating for those who undergo it.

Female genital mutilation: where

Female genital mutilation (FGM), also known as female genital cutting or female circumcision, is the ritual removal of some or all of the external female genitalia. The procedure is typically performed on girls between the ages of four and 14, and is often done without anesthesia or pain relief.

FGM is most commonly practiced in Africa, the Middle East, and South Asia. It is estimated that more than 200 million girls and women alive today have undergone some form of FGM. The procedure is typically performed by a traditional circumciser using a razor or sharp knife.

There are no medical benefits to FGM. The procedure can cause severe bleeding and problems urinating, and it can lead to infection, infertility, and an increased risk of childbirth complications. FGM is recognized as a human rights violation by the United Nations and is outlawed in more than 30 countries.

Despite the risks, many girls are forced to undergo FGM by their families and communities. In some cases, girls who refuse to undergo the procedure are subjected to violence, ostracism, or even death.

FGM is a devastating practice that often has lifelong consequences for girls and women. If you or someone you know has been affected by FGM, there are organizations that can provide support and assistance.

Female genital mutilation: why

Female genital mutilation (FGM) is a practice that involves partially or completely removing the external female genitalia for non-medical reasons. The procedure is usually performed on girls between the ages of four and 14, and can have a number of consequences for young girls and women.

FGM is associated with a number of health risks, including bleeding, infection, and even death. In addition, FGM can lead to a number of problems during childbirth, including an increased risk of fistula formation. FGM can also cause psychological trauma, and is often performed without the consent of the girl or woman involved.

There is no medical justification for FGM, and the practice is recognized as a human rights violation by a number of international organizations. Despite this, FGM is still practiced in many parts of the world, often as a way to control female sexuality or as a part of traditional cultural beliefs.

If you are a girl or woman who has undergone FGM, or if you are considering the procedure, it is important to be aware of the risks and consequences. Talk to a doctor or other medical professional to get more information, and make sure you are making an informed decision.

Female genital mutilation: consequences

Female genital mutilation, also known as female circumcision or FGM, is the partial or complete removal of the external female genitalia. The procedure is typically performed on girls between the ages of four and 14, and is usually done without anesthesia.

FGM can cause a number of short-term and long-term health consequences for girls and women. In the short-term, FGM can cause severe bleeding, infection, cysts, and infertility. In the long-term, FGM can lead to problems with urination, menstruation, and sexual intercourse. FGM can also cause psychological trauma.

There is no medical reason to perform FGM, and the procedure is not recognized by any major medical organization. FGM is illegal in many countries, but the practice persists in some communities due to cultural beliefs.

Education is key to ending FGM. It is important to raise awareness of the risks and consequences of the procedure, and to empower girls and women to make their own decisions about their bodies.

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